Connor Clemett

Honours Student
Department of Anatomy with Medical Imaging

 

ABOUT CONNOR CLEMETT

Spinal Cord Injury Research Facility, Department of Anatomy

Things that give more meaning to my work

Connor believes that one of the things that links scientists across the world is the real sense of endeavour in their work – as they are all trying to find out more about the world and leave a meaningful contribution.

Upon graduated from the University of Auckland with a Bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Sciences, he was certain that science isn’t just a career but something that satisfies his curiosity like nothing else has.

He first became captured by neuroscience when he won the Brain Bee Challenge in the South Island. This is when he met Professor Emeritus Louise Nicholson, who has since mentored and supported his research with the Centre for Brain Research.  Louise’s compassion towards people living with a spinal cord injury is a true inspiration to Connor.

Currently, Connor is undergoing an Honours Degree at the Spinal Cord Injury Research Facility (SCIRF), trying to understand how the Blood Brain Barrier changes in response to inflammatory signals, and how he might be able to exploit its behaviour by providing enhanced protection to the central nervous system following a spinal cord injury.

“If we can find ways to help people, many whom we may never meet, then science really is a worthwhile pursuit”

Even though the discovery of new things is enough to motivate and excite Connor, during his first few months at the research centre he’s been exposed to elements that have given much more meaning to his work.

Connor has been able to present his research to the general public at Brain Day 2017 and he’s also been introduced to people that are living with a spinal cord injury through the SCIRF’s relationship with the CatWalk Trust, the non-profit organisation that funds this facility.

“SCI sufferers approaching  me to talk about how my research may be able to help them has only reinforced the reasons why I chose to pursue science”